Breast Cancer Education: Clinical Breast Exam

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A clinical breast exam (CBE) is a physical exam done by a health care provider as part of your regular medical check-up. Your provider should carefully feel your breasts and underarms for any changes or abnormalities (such as a lump). He/she should visually check your breasts while you are sitting up and physically examine your breasts while you are lying down. If a CBE is not offered at your check-up and you would like one, ask your provider if he or she can perform one (or refer you to someone who can).

If you are 20-39 years old, get a CBE at least every three years. If you are 40 or older, have your mammogram close to the time of your CBE. In women ages 40 and older, CBE combined with mammography may find more cancers than mammography alone. When used together at yearly check-ups, fewer breast cancers are missed. However, whereas CBE is an important complement to mammography, it is not a substitute for mammograms in women 40 and older.

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) recommends that men at higher risk of breast cancer have a clinical breast exam every six to 12 months, starting at age 35. Women who are at a higher risk of breast cancer should speak with their doctor about when and how often they should get screened.

Learn more: http://ww5.komen.org/BreastCancer/ClinicalBreastExam.html

Breast Cancer Education: What is Breast Cancer?

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In a healthy body, natural systems control the creation, growth, and death of cells. Most of the time cells divide and grow in an orderly manner. But sometimes, cells grow out of control. This kind of growth of cells forms a mass or lump called a tumor. Tumors can be either benign or malignant. Benign tumors are not cancerous. The cells of a benign tumor do not invade nearby tissue or spread to any other parts of the body. Malignant tumors are cancerous. These tumor cells can invade nearby tissue and spread to other parts of the body. A malignant tumor that develops in the breast is called breast cancer.

Tumors in the breast tend to grow slowly. By the time a lump is large enough to feel, it may have been growing for as long as 10 years. However, some tumors are aggressive and grow much faster.. That is why regular breast cancer screening to find early changes is so important. If breast cancer is found early, there are more treatment options and a greater chance of survival.

Between 50 and 75 percent of breast cancers begin in the milk ducts (canals that carry milk from the lobules to a nipple opening during breastfeeding) and 10 to 15 percent begin in the lobules (spherical-shaped sacs in the breast that produce milk) and a few begin in other breast tissues.

It is important to understand the differences between invasive breast cancer and non-invasive breast cancer, called ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). (Although DCIS is non-invasive, without treatment, it can develop into invasive breast cancer.) These differences affect treatment and prognosis.

Non-invasive breast cancer occurs when abnormal cells grow inside the milk ducts.

Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) occurs when abnormal cells grow inside the milk ducts but have not spread to nearby tissue or beyond. The term “in situ” means “in place.” With DCIS, the abnormal cells are still “in place” inside the milk ducts. DCIS is a non-invasive breast cancer (you may also hear the term “pre-invasive breast carcinoma”). Although the abnormal cells have not spread to tissues outside the ducts, without treatment, they can develop into invasive breast cancer.

Invasive breast cancer occurs when abnormal cells from inside the milk ducts or lobules break out into nearby breast tissue.  Some less common invasive breast cancers include: inflammatory breast cancer, Paget disease of the breast and metaplastic breast cancer.

Cancer cells can travel from the breast to other parts of the body through the blood stream or the lymphatic system (a network of lymph nodes and vessels throughout the body). They may travel early in the process when the tumor is small, or later when the tumor is large.

The lymph nodes (small clumps of immune cells that act as filters for the lymphatic system) in the underarm area (the axillary lymph nodes) are the first place breast cancer is likely to spread.

Metastatic breast cancer is Stage IV or advanced breast cancer that has spread beyond the breast to other organs in the body (most often the bones, lungs, liver or brain).  This is not a specific type of breast cancer, but rather a stage of breast cancer. Although metastatic breast cancer has spread to another part of the body, it is considered and treated as breast cancer. For example, breast cancer that has spread to the bones is still breast cancer (not bone cancer) and is treated with breast cancer drugs, rather than treatments for a cancer that began in the bones.

Learn more: http://ww5.komen.org/BreastCancer/WhatisBreastCancer.html and http://ww5.komen.org/uploadedFiles/Content_Binaries/806-368a.pdf